About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 17
CNBC 11
FBC 5
CSPAN2 4
KQED (PBS) 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CNNW 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
WETA 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 60
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)
taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest? >> i put greece out on its own because the magnitude of the downturn in greece has been phenomena
's the only way that you can get an international agreement. -- can't do it by begging the kyoto protocol approach was to beg. beg all the other countries to pick some target and then reach that target without any -- and, of course, even though many countries agreed like canada, they soon abandon it -- when it's not convenient, they abandon it -- you have to -- the only way you can enforce it is with the price, and that -- so that could be done. and, you know, i was in china and the china -- chinese leaders understand this. they don't deny their climate problem. they are engineers and they're rationale, and they don't want to be addicted to fossil fuels the way the united states is and have to protect the supply line around the world, so they are, number one in solar panels, wind power and nuclear power, building thirty nuclear power plants. so i don't -- but, of course, they do have a major problem with so many people in poverty and they're -- and they need -- they know they need to get them out of poverty or they may -- their government may not survive. so the -- of course, they're doin
soldiers begged him not to go, he told them to support general burnside as they had supported him and off he went. a great moment that vindicated his patriotism in a difficult year. but the other thing to remember and i alluded to it in the speech was bad in april 1861, when the confederates fired on work sumpter, there was not a single man in the north who had ever led more than 1000 troops in battle. and the men who had led that anywhere in their 60's. the war was being commanded by, in the best case, captains in the regular army who had experience commanding one or 200 men and in the worst case, politicians who had never led a single person in battle. so the fact that lincoln had a hard time finding the generals who could lease -- lead these vast armies of 100,000 men are more shouldn't surprise us. .. and every day he heard from people urging him to do nothing about slavery, that the issue is not slavery. his southern border of the union was comprised of four slaveowning states, missouri, kentucky, maryland and delaware. he was in constant fear of any move that would cause them to sim
. you kw, they not onlywn the twilight saga and hunger games which are begging obviously for sequels but big tv production studio as well, have mad men, weed, anger management, a lot of food renewal seasons ahead for those and lots of sequels on the movies, the stock is only 11 times earnings, we think there is more to go, although the name has done well. >> aqua financial a new pick here, ocn. >> this stock shot more than double this year, 34 and change, how much higher in the next twelve months, do you think? >> well, i think it can go higher, it had a little pullback today and i think it i attractive on pullback, they are the low cost producer of servicing mortgage debt, particularly the low quality sub prime mortgage debt, new york banks want out of that, they have gotten the book from j.p. morgan, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, they are the low cost producer provider, only sell nine or ten times forward earnings, the valuation is expensive and i think the stock has room to go and maybe another two or three years to it. >> you have positions in both of those shares, sandy? >> the
she comes back. there is no mass-produced hun. every human beg is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep nuer sto. the only place in the world you'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusiveollection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to aust to the support your bodyeeds. each of your bodies. in the name of human individuality: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. clusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. comfort individualized. is holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30% savings. cheryl: nicole petallides give us one of the best of the performers and now for one of the worst we go back to nicole petallides. >> we are looking at a name under
beg with the court not to incarcerate them. what happens? you spend time in jail and you pay the fine. but you are fault a corporate client. you are an individual. >>shepard: the money they made for profit was $2.5 billion in the last quarter. the fine is $600 million less than that. the people who are sitting on this side of the aisle on this side of the border there, and are seeing what this corruption has done and what it has done to the nation over time we are supposed to say well, they made them pay $1.9 billion and no one is going to jail? i cannot imagine too many are happy about this. >>guest: i don't think so. the in edge for corporate america is commit your crime and as one put it, better to seek forgiveness than ask permission. that is what they are doing, seeking forgiveness after the fact. again, if this was an individual, they would be sitting in front of a federal district court judge probably incarcerated awaiting sentencing. >>shepard: but, instead, their stock is up today. thank you. >> police say there is no question, a murder on a crowded street in the middle of th
do that not in a dictatorial way but not also begging, you know, you cannot say to a musician, excuse me, can you please give me this. even if it is a story of carlos cliver, great conductor that was a friend, great friend of mine. we were very, very good friends. and during a rehearsal, he was asking a german orchestra for a pianissimo. and the players answered almost in a rude way saying i am playing piano, i am playing piano, sometime you have this kind of answer. and clyber answered, said, you know, conductors are not dictators. we are like poor man outside the church. with our hat in the hand. and if we have one penny, we are happy. but if we receive two, we are more happy. so it was a very great answer. we ask, we don't demand we ask for something. and when you have a great orchestra, with a great orchestra you can get what you want. so if you don't get what you want, it's your fault. >> rose: it's your fault if you don't get it. >> for several reasons. because are you not good enough. are you not loved. we are not liked. they don't trust you. you don't have the right technique.
place. well, i would beg that his son is probably not the best spokesman. david: i mean i don't think somebody runs for six years straight without wanting the job. adam: of course romney wanted to be president. david: we don't believe you tagg, sorry. well stuart may be out for christmas, but here's something that can get us all into the holiday spirit. take a listen. stuart: two of my beautiful granddaughters will be with us this christmas, abigail and paige are watching right now. this is for you. 'twas the night before christmas when all through the house not a creature was stirring not even a mouse. the stockings were hung by the chimney with care in hopes that st. nicholas soon would be there. the children were nestled all snug in their beds while visions of sugar plums danced in their heads. and mama in her kerchief and in her cap had just settled our brains for a long winter's nap. when out on the lawn there arose such a clatter i sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. in a twinkling i heard on the roof the prancing and pulling of each little hoof. as i drew in my head
as almost as many counter comments as supportive comments. so it begs the question, is twitter a way to kind of unite an army of supporters? >> absolutely. technology is changing the art of persuasion. what everybody -- look at history. look at history just a few weeks ago. this guy won the white house with technology. we talked about it here before. he used technology to get re-elected. he used it to get in the first time. the only difference that he's doing this time that he didn't do the first time is he is making sure he doesn't tone down the machine. now for the very first time we have this issue that he wants the american public to weigh in on and if you think about the demographic, the president of the united states can come into the living room, a voter, up to 30, say, in their comfort zone and talk to them one on one and make an issue out of the $2,000. in their comfort zone, not on the network news, daily newspaper but in a very personal way in a way that are resonates with that demographic. i think it's going to be very impactful. >> the numbers are phenomenal. the president has n
are nodding your head about that. guest: i beg to differ with you on that. they are part of my task force which meets every other week with about 40 other professionals from schools and psychologists. we work on the different issues. host: what is their mission? guest: to work on the mental health issue. they did not exert as much of their influence where they could or should. i think that is a stigma and that they are not as well organized in outreach and be able to get out to the different areas that are needed. i know them very well and they are wonderful people. there are wonderful organizations that need to work with them. they are effective. we need to work at the local levels at the schools, where children were working at the -- they can begin to spot some of these disorders and talk to the parents and to try to solve them at the early ages. that is one thing that one group does. they provide grants and scholarships to put on site clinicians to help these youngsters, educate the teachers and work with the families to get to the bottom of what eails a child. guest: we need to rethin
of the land. lan but also begs the question of, do you want to spend your time trying to do the things it did not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live coverage of the house here and c-span. next, retiring senator kent conrad reflects on his career in congress
, is begging for money. -- that great project, is begging for money. this is the sort of thing that ought to be supported by the u.s. government. the final thing we need to do in terms of non state actors, al qaeda came closest to developing wmd when they were in control of territory in afghanistan. we have to keep groups like that from getting a base. >> chemical, i wonder if you could talk a little bit about nuclear terrorism. >> again, i am a scientist. i think it is a very small probability. i reject the idea of 1% or 50%. the chance of fukushima happening was less than 1%. it is a low probability, but a horrific consequences. i think if proliferation happens, as nuclear capabilities bread, you'll have more of the wherewithal for terrorists to exploit and therefore more opportunities. i would like to emphasize what was said, you have to deny the territory. that is the lesson in afghanistan. you don't want to give these people time and space to work on these kind of weapons. with that being said, if you look at sudan, somalia, a couple of places, is not an easy thing to accomplish. and
in there. >> so to my friend carter, i beg to differ. please, please let me differ. first of all, i'd like to say i'm not wildly excited about any of these names. the spending budget for these companies in the tens of billions of dollars to keep in constant need for higher band width. and verizon is a bond proxy. yielding close to 5%, it's closer to a junk bond proxy with a high grade quality to it. so i kind of like that if you're into safe investing. problem with sprint is they are the proverbial. they have not run commensurately as a business. i'm sure someone could take them out, but i'm not sure you want to buy the name just on that. >> so is there anything that would make you want to own these then, zach? >> no. i suppose if i was into -- 27 years old and needed a 4.7% yield on something i thought had a good chance of not going down a lot were verizon would be attractive for those reasons. >> well, that is certainly a reason to own them. >> right. it is as he points out 5%. at this point at this multiple at this appreciation as you sarted the segment, one of the best performers in th
that belonged to his great grandfather or the win beg go with the nine custom surf boards inside. the family says they're just happy john made it home for christmas. they expect their property eventually to be returned, also. jamie, back to you. >> jamie: thanks so much. happy ending there. christians, the world over, are celebrating the birth of christ. it's already christmas day at the vatican. we have live pictures as pope benedict holds his midnight mass. this is actually tape of what happened earlier. he got an early bedtime tonight because tomorrow he will give his early christmas address to pilgrims who show up in st. peters square. but meantime thousands of faithful are marking christ's birth where it happened. this is live, folks. it's midnight mass. top roman cleric said this year they're also celebrating the birth of the state of palestine. what he is talking about is the united nations recent vote to recognize the palestinian state. a move that both the united states and israel opposed. leland vittert with the news live in bethlehem. leland? >> jamie, midnight mass here just ende
, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration, at least in the second term. this is one squishy area in his presidency. i spent a lot of time on it. my long study of intelligence on the outside, amateur at it, but presidents think you can snap your fingers, and the cia does miraclous things. it doesn't work that way. eisenhower did understand that. he was reasonable about this. this is all highly relevant because ri
no, i'm not. he took to begging. he asked, cajoled, he asked for 50 destroyers. f.d.r. dragged his feet. first he said no. then he said maybe. then by november of 1940 the first five or six of the 50 dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he
discussing the war on coal. that's a lot. why the false identity is the question that continues to be begged and hopefully we can answer. >> there wasn't a regulation that she didn't like and she didn't want to impose. >> can the coal companies breathe easier now? can we see new power generation happening in this country or are we going get someone just like her because they'll want to work for president obama? >> right. here's the thing. she was hailed by rolling stone as the most progressive ep achieve ever, but at the end of the day she was effectuating a radical agenda set by the president. this war on coal was set forth when he gave his shellacking press conference and said there were other ways to skin that cat. so you're going to get somebody who wants the job to effectuate his agenda and it won't be anybody much better, i suppose, but the good news may lie on what we find. there are 12,000 e-mails that by their very nature assuming the false identity that she didn't want the public to see and these on coal.00 e-mails addressing maybe there was news in there that was candid and becaus
it's a beg thy neighbor. everybody is printing -- >> at the core of what the fed is trying to do is phillips curvean in that they're trying to trade short-term gains in unemployment for modest upticks in inflation. if they get their way, presumably the gold bowls will come back out of the woodwork. >> if it goes from 200 to 1, 800, it's anticipated. >> how much did that suit cost? >> not very much. tie's a different story. >> not $1,800? >> no, not $1,800. >> you should be able to buy a suit for an ounce of gold. that's always been the -- >> i was not aware of the suit-to-gold ratio. >> suit-to-gold ratio. you -- never, never been your -- >> suits -- >> you've always need good five or six troy ounces to buy -- >> you buy a brioni suit, can you pay in gold bars? >> that's how i usually do. it. >>> real quick, boxing day according to wikipedia, traditionally the day following christmas when servants and tradesmen would receive gifts from their supervisors. this was an old english tradition apparently when servants would wait on their masters on christmas day, the servants of the we
the range of the 6,000 kilometers. the question then begs how realistic is it that north korea would be a threat to the united states? >> through pro live raig they could be a threat to the united states. and if they were to hit our allies in the near range. in the south and also japan. those are the near-term risks. but proliferation could occur at any time. they were able to reach to hawaii ... bill: history shows they are not very good at this. are they getting better? >> only more tests will tell. you are correct history has shown it's been embarrassing for them. you would have to ask if you were rational why would you take a high-risk test like this with so many eyes watching? bill: you mentioned the obama administration. how are they reacting? was is our response? >> our response tends to look first to the yate united nation. there is talk of proportional sanctions being considered at the security council should north korea test. but it's clear that is not going to change the trajectory of north korea's per suit of a nuclear program. bill: steven yates, thank you. we are watchi
the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing down an entire network of armed militants and winning. zain verjee, cnn, london. >>> next, the stories that
all over the country begging businesses to leave california and come to us. the mayor of phoenix will give us his sales pitch next. listen to this. >> california honestly is like a hot blonde high school chick who has been getting by on her looks, never having to study, not having to exercise or eat right. just a beautiful genetic hand, beautiful ocean, beautiful weather, and now she's 45 and she's falling apart. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to dot! now we need aittle bit more... [ male announcer ] at humna, we understand the value of quality time andersonal attentio which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quity time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! oh [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] huna thanks the physicians, nurses, hositals, pharmacists d other health professionals who helped us achieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become thfirst and only national medicare advantage company to achieve a 5-star rating foa medicare plan... your efrts re
extent. right now 85 points is not a bad day. >> fiscal cliff, fiscal goal, begging you to buy stocks and that is what you have to do, only place you can get any yield. nicole: we are looking at stocks that can be beaten down and the action we have seen from the fed making easier to buy stocks? >> as long as interest rates are zero, and you will see that going until the end of the year once we get through the tax mess with year end selling and this year we will see a real pop and a true january effect. nicole: apple, we have seen it move around a lot. what is the broadbased feeling on tech and apple? >> i love the stock but quite frankly, reinventing the wheel, you can't short company's agreement of the wheel all time. tracy: okay. nicole: there you have it. giving us some insight into this market. not bad so far. ashley: hanging in there. thank you very much in 15 minutes. nicole: tracy: service capital management has sold its stake in freedomgroup whose rifle was used in the connecticut school massacre friday. is this a new front in the war over gun control? here with the latest is
human beg is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep nuer store. the only place in the world you'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. in the name of human individuality: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. exclusively at o of our 400 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30% savings. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helpi
. so, i'm begging members of congress, and the executive, to please get something done here that reassures consumers, reassures business operations, most important of all, to create the jobs in america, and these are permanent jobs that we want to have created. please provide them with the incentive to use the monetary wherewithal, whether it's the right amount or an excessive amount which i would argue, but that's not the issue. the issue is, they need to be incentives to use widely available liquidity, the lowest interest rates in american history, put it to work, to create more american jobs, and increase american prosperity. >> if we're really arguing -- >> unless they do that they will have failed the american people. >> the fiscal cliff brings a lot of austerity very quickly. but we all think that, you know, sooner or later we need some type of austerity, whether it's on a scale, you know, like the fiscal cliff is a 10, we don't want a deal that is a 1, that just, you know, that doesn't cut spending, that doesn't raise revenue. so i just worry that, you know, we seem l
for everybody under, and you pick the number. >> i would just beg, you know, it's like you want to beg these guys in d.c. to do something. to help this country just get to where it was. get people to work. they can do it. they really can. >> i went to a doctor this morning, and apple didn't come up and i was thinking, hey, could be closer to -- >> it did not come up. this is the first thought that didn't come up, tempted to go to the dentist just to get a dentist check. get an opinion on how many people are worried about apple. >> grover has said point blank that you're finished if you vote for a tax increase. and grover so far has been much more powerful than boehner. like the shadow governor of the republican party. everyone knows that conference call that grover runs keeps everybody in line. >> when do you think we're going to get to 6.5? >> i think it will take three years. >> really? i think it will take awhile. i see unemployment coming down to the low 70s, sometime next year. or sometime after next year, 2015 or so. >> good monday morning, we're live here at post nine at the new
that is speaking, i beg to defer with her because we have been without a doctor -- my husband is on medicare. i'm paying for an individual policy but we've been without a doctor since june, she moved. our group practice told us they can't get a doctor. that the doctors are coming out at the university or wherever they are not going into general practice and internal medicine because of the medicare situation. they are going where they can make more money. so we're still without a doctor, here it is december. >> what are you doing? >> an on staff sees us if we need a flu shot or whatever. as for having a doctor who knew our routine and someone we would feel comfortable with we're waiting for them to have one on staff. >> where is rochelle, virginia? >> we go to the county that is nearest to us. it is a university of virginia practice out of charlottesville. we normally always go to those doctors and they treat mostly elderly. >> iris, if you have have a life situation or need to see a fission for, anything beyond a flu shot, what do you do right now? >> that's what i said. we have to see whoever
that is speaking, sarah kliff, i beg to differ with her because we have been without a doctor -- my husband is on medicare and i am still paying for an individual policy. we have been without a doctor since back in june and our group practice has told us they cannot get a doctor. the doctors that are coming out on the going into general practice or internal medicine because of the medicare situation, that they are going where they can make more money. we are still without a doctor. host: what are you doing? caller: they will give us a flu shot or whatever but as for having a doctor that new our routine and would be able to -- that we would feel comfortable with, we are waiting for one to have on staff. we go to the doctors in orange county. it is a university of virginia practice out of charlottesville. we normally have always gone to those doctors, and they treat a lot of elderly. host: if you have a life situation, what do you do right now? caller: we have to see whoever is on staff there that is still there as far as any kind of situation. my husband just had shingles and he was being tr
people, begging for money. i think you spend maybe one- third to one-half of your time asking people for money. that should not be the main objective of our job. we should be doing the job for the people instead of worrying about raising money. i do not know what the answer is. maybe limiting the terms of the campaign, i do not know what it is. you cannot limit the funding because of the first amendment. it is gone way beyond the pale. i think -- we have state representatives that are spending three-quarters of a million dollars for house in indiana. we have gone beyond where we should. >> in addition to your long service, you have been on foreign affairs. >> 30 years. >> a somewhat early association was with jesse helms. how did that alliance come together? let's start with that part of the story. >> i was always a strong anti- communists. i never liked fidel castro. i became chairman of the subcommittee on western hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- ileanaan friends, ke ros-lehtinen and bob menendez and we worked hard to put sanctions on castro to try to bring that regime d
christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm filling in for the ecclesiastical movement until friday. because of dated translations, many version of the bible imply otherwise. as for the old testament they cite leviticus. most acknowledge if we took all of the old testaments literally most of us would make it to age 40. >> stephanie: kill everyone that commits adultery, kill rebellious sons who disaway their parents. kill anyone who works on the sabbath. jesus never addressed the subject of homosexuality other than what can be inferred from his exam of loving and accepting everyone. they were referring to marriage between a man and a woman. where jesus protested the practice of men getting rid of inconvenient wives by handing them
veterans like him who stand with locked arms begging us to pass this convention, we owe it to the disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once and again for the rights of the disabled and for expanding opportunity not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of aoeg ism in that -- egotism in that statement, but i believe it is -- i ask for 30 additional seconds. but i believe it is factual that america is an exceptional nation twhe steps forward in the -- when it steps forward in the belief that freedom, liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issue stop us from focusing on the reality that what we are doing is historic not just for america but for the world. we owe it not just to bob dole. we owe it to the disabled veterans and the disabled community to stand up and say to the world join us. join us in expanding the reach of opportunity to those who have been left behind. i yield the floor.
lauz but born with an . >> you know, i beg to differ, mr. president. to me, i understand the use of its is a weapon but to me the real problem isn't the debt ceiling. it's the debt. the debt is the problem. you know, to have an unlimited amount of money to call upon is too much power power for one person. it's always in our country been about checks and balances but i think this administration just wants more checks and no balancing of the checkbook. that isn't the kind of check and balance that i think the people that wrote the constitution had in mind. now, let's look at it a different way, when we think of, you know, some good entertainment, there's, you know, bob hope, the road to morocco, the road to singapore. i don't think that we want to have a movie someday called the road to the weimar republic because bob hope was in the old movies. there's no hope in that new movie and i think this issue really has to be discussed. now i understand there's issues about compromise and everybody has heard that the president and the democrats won the white house. i understand that but the debt
, this woman tells us. if someone has breakfast, they can't afford dinner. please, have mercy, they beg. on the street we meet four boys. they ask if we think it's safe enough for them to go back home. they talk of tanks firing and seeing other children lose limbs. they say what they witnessed has made them all decide to be doctors to save the victims of war. >> arwa damon on the ground in northern syria, and she's joining us live via skype, and, arwa, it is just amazing to see the slees of life, what is taking place there on the ground. it barely seems like people are able to cope in any kind of normal fashion. when you go from village to village or family to family, do you get a sense at all that there's an end game here, that they see an end and a way that they can pick up their lives and move on, or this is just the way they're going to exist for quite some time? >> it's so difficult to put into words, suzanne, exactly what it is that these families have been going through. many of them are so frustrated, they're so angry. just earlier today, for example, we were in aleppo once agai
headline out of washington, d.c. it begs the question, where do stocks go from here? if we do get a partial deal on the fiscal cliff, what analysts say would happen is we'd probably see a modest sell-off with the tone more negative as time goes on. with a partial deal, there's less certainty for the marketplace. without a deal at all, there could be a rude awakening for investors when everybody wakes up up and goes back to work on wednesday and when the market re-opens. it's not a given that congress will do something. some experts are actually hoping to see a big sell-off in the market and could inspire policy-making. one points out although the market is a disciplinarian, it's not a sure thing that we get a clean and lasting solution. something the market is looking for. suzanne. >> thank you. >>> president obama expected to speak at the white house. we're looking at about five minutes away or so. we'll bring it to you live as soon as he begins. we'll have, of course, our team of reporters to do some analysis. we'll take a quick break and be right back. >>> welcome to viewers across the c
up under most of the proposals. >> but this all begs the question of a great example this whole fiscal cliff the conversation we're having right here around the table about the simplification of our tax system. we laid out back during the campaign was basically a 20% flat tax across the board and gets away from all of these exemptions and all of the quite frankly you having to have two cpas and a lawyer to be able to do your taxes. and that's where washington really needs to be focused when we talk about what do they really need to be doing up there talking about spending obviously and talking about how you simplify the tax code in this country. allowing that -- the foreign dollars that are raised offshore to come back in here at a relatively low tax rate. to be able to drive the economy of this country. that's what they need to be talking about instead of the -- >> the only people that want a complicated tax code are the lobbyists. people may argue over the end rate but --? the current administration wants a complicated tax code, too, because the more you keep it complicated, t
would end up killing charities and forcing people to come begging, oh, please, government, would you please give me a morsel, give me another crumb? so which ever party happens to be in power gets more power. republican or democrat. and we've got to stop that cycle of dependency. we have got to help people reach their god-given potential. and so, when you hear about fair share, you want an equal percentage tax, let's have one for warren buffett and the same rate for his secretary. let's make the income tax, the corporate tax, the capital gains tax, the gift tax, the estate tax, let's just make them all 15% across the board. i'll never have a problem with estate tax. but it is outrageous to make people sell their family farm or sell a business or get in hoc up to their ears for something their parents have worked a lifetime to build up. and people like warren buffett, the ultrarich, they're not going to have to worry about the estate tax because they're able to pay megabucks for lawyers and brilliant financial analysts to come up with a way, usually involving life insurance and differ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)